All posts tagged: #fringe

Review: F*ckboys The Musical

‘A haphazard guide to navigating the modern dating scene’. When my friends and I scanned the pages of the Fringe guide, this was the show we most wanted to see. As a bunch of 30-something women who ourselves, bumbled through the world of modern dating dodging time-wasters, creeps and of course plenty of the aforementioned – we were itching to get along and check out this musical for our f*ckboys 101 education. The story starts, when four women walk into a bar for their regular Wednesday night karaoke sesh. Some are single, some are not and one is horribly heartbroken to the point of shrewish cynicism. Their casual conversation is punctuated time after time by over-confident men with abnormally large egos who turn bitter and nasty each time their advances are rejected – earning them the label of, you guessed it f*ckboys. What is a f*ckboy you ask? These talented ladies take care of that through their original score of witty songs, giving everyone the lowdown on what it really takes to make it into …

Review: May Contain Traces of Reading

Imagine a stand-up comedy show where the star doesn’t utter a single word. You could be excused for being apprehensive in anticipation of a badly executed mime, but this show is more ‘giant palm cards’ than Marcel Marceau, laced with a touch of Mr Bean. It’s an interesting navigation of Robert Mitchell’s checklist of comedy prowess through the unspoken word. The beauty of this style of show is the lack of of awkward silences, remedied by Mitchell’s arsenal of Dad jokes kept up his sleeve (or in his carefully pre-prepared folder). Supported by a sassy sidekick of the digital variety, this show is warm, expressive and performed like a well-oiled machine, and unique in that heckling is highly encouraged during the performance – if only so Robert can make excellent use of his rather large pre-prepared folder chock-full of ‘sick comedian burns’. The show fell a little short for me after a long day of reading at work, but is relatively family friendly and has definite appeal for the deaf community. “May Contain Traces of …

Arts Review: All This Living

As the intro to this piece states, ‘age comes to us all you know,’ we’re reminded of this in the opening act, a recollection of a bathroom encounter, when some young pretty things, applying lipstick in the mirror, label the character, Jay, portrayed beautifully by Camilla Blunden, ‘just an old woman.’ This comment, makes it real for her, and thus launches the rest of the performance where she digs deeply into the phenomenon of getting old, and how over time, older women somehow lose their voice, become invisible, and incorrectly feel they have become a burden to society. As the piece progresses, she attempts to turn these beliefs on their head, re-empowering women, as wise, important, highly visible beings with stories to tell, all the while batting off the inner voices that creep up, and try to convince her otherwise. This show was difficult to follow in parts, as the narrative jumped from whimsical inner thought to thought, from real life to fantasy through paint stores, pots and pans, to magical woods filled with fiery …