All posts filed under: Reviews

Badass

Badass is a new comedy cabaret creation from the mind of Tash York (Desperettes, Adulting, These Things Take Wine) – it’s loud, in your face and straight up fun. Through the power of parody and clever lyrical mash ups, Tash brings her audience on her own personal journey of being (or becoming) a badass – which turns out to be a sweet rollercoaster of emotions touching on real life mental health issues, bullying (and consequently standing up for yourself), love lost and found. Not too heavy and not too light.. as they say, just right. Like many good shows, Tash connects with her audience through ‘me too’ (not #metoo) moments, like feeling as though you’ve really got your life together when you’ve stocked up on organising-type stationary at your local Officeworks, or somehow racking up an unimaginable amount of unpaid parking fines. Like many great shows, Badass ends with a bang – a Rage Against the Machine (or the patriarchy.. am I right ladies…) singalong which everyone more than enthusiastically joined in with fervour. Tash …

Midsumma Review: Rebel

It’s been three years this January since the passing of legendary rock star David Bowie, and since his death many tribute shows have popped up – but none have pushed the boundaries of blended performance crafts quite like Rebel. Premiering as part of the 2019 Midsumma Festival program, and choreographed, directed and produced by Melbourne’s Highwire Entertainment, Rebel is a solid act, combining music, circus acrobatics and visual art into a live concert, glam rock and roll cabaret with heart stopping physical feats, a costume selection to die for and enough talent to make you sick. We witnessed roller skating trapeze, a hoops routine performed in eleven inch wedges, flames, flare and a bloke working an aerial pole in a pair of high top chucks like it was nothing, backed by a band of triple talented musicians. Bowie’s best hits were brought to life by the exceptionally charismatic Stewart Reeve, who’s amazing voice features enough embodiment of the Thin White Duke to bring each song perfectly to life, but still retain his own vocal flavour. …

Get your Summer Skates On

For the first three weeks of December, the Queen Victoria Market will play host to the Air Canada Ice Rink – Melbourne’s first ever summer outdoor ice skating rink. Those who crave a small taste of a white Christmas experience can hit the ice and show off their moves in a 45-minute session for the small price of $15 (adults), $10 (kids under 14) or a family of four for just $45. Sessions run every hour and can be purchased rink side – though we recommend pre-purchasing tickets online to avoid disappointment. Canadian-themed treats like maple syrup ice cream and poutine (a delicious concoction of french fries, gravy and cheese curds for the uninitiated) are also available for purchase aside the ice rink as well as popcorn and fairy floss for the kids (and young at heart). If you are thinking of taking the team from work for a little bit of skating fun, why not pair it with the Wednesday Summer Night markets for a spectacular feed for the perfect work Christmas party with …

Summer Nights – the Night Markets Return for 2019

The Summer Night Markets kicked off last week again and despite being a somewhat miserable night, the event proved to be as popular as ever with crowds turning up to get a taste of their favourite food stalls and check out some new flavours for the 2018/19 season. The Market boasts 60 global street food stalls and this year the delicious dining options are better than ever with all the usual favourites like Mussel Pot, Running Bull Sangria and Wonderbao returning again with their popular offering, as well as donut balls of every possible flavour including Nutella, salted caramel and melted marshmallow from Taki’s Balls – you’ll find these quite addictive, but they are perfect to share. If you like your dinner with a side of Instagrammable flair, be sure to check out Flying Noodles for their servings of noodles that float in mid air over the plate, over chopsticks held by seemingly invisible hands. Beer, wine and cider is also on offer from local breweries, Brick Lane, Coldstream and Mitchelton Wines. The Summer Night …

Review: F*ckboys The Musical

‘A haphazard guide to navigating the modern dating scene’. When my friends and I scanned the pages of the Fringe guide, this was the show we most wanted to see. As a bunch of 30-something women who ourselves, bumbled through the world of modern dating dodging time-wasters, creeps and of course plenty of the aforementioned – we were itching to get along and check out this musical for our f*ckboys 101 education. The story starts, when four women walk into a bar for their regular Wednesday night karaoke sesh. Some are single, some are not and one is horribly heartbroken to the point of shrewish cynicism. Their casual conversation is punctuated time after time by over-confident men with abnormally large egos who turn bitter and nasty each time their advances are rejected – earning them the label of, you guessed it f*ckboys. What is a f*ckboy you ask? These talented ladies take care of that through their original score of witty songs, giving everyone the lowdown on what it really takes to make it into …

Review: May Contain Traces of Reading

Imagine a stand-up comedy show where the star doesn’t utter a single word. You could be excused for being apprehensive in anticipation of a badly executed mime, but this show is more ‘giant palm cards’ than Marcel Marceau, laced with a touch of Mr Bean. It’s an interesting navigation of Robert Mitchell’s checklist of comedy prowess through the unspoken word. The beauty of this style of show is the lack of of awkward silences, remedied by Mitchell’s arsenal of Dad jokes kept up his sleeve (or in his carefully pre-prepared folder). Supported by a sassy sidekick of the digital variety, this show is warm, expressive and performed like a well-oiled machine, and unique in that heckling is highly encouraged during the performance – if only so Robert can make excellent use of his rather large pre-prepared folder chock-full of ‘sick comedian burns’. The show fell a little short for me after a long day of reading at work, but is relatively family friendly and has definite appeal for the deaf community. “May Contain Traces of …

Review: Oil Babies

Image: Lachlan Woods Harrowing. That’s how I would describe the powerful opening scene of Oil Babies when it debuted this week at Northcote Town Hall. Described as an ‘exploration of our relationship to climate change and the female body’ and brought to life by three, strong female leads, Oil Babies is an impactful, confronting and distinctly female performance piece which focussed on the not unknown concerns about real-life human anxieties, the health and future of planet earth. Dark, peppered with enough comedy to keep you from the pits of despair, and laced together with real-world issues and environmental disasters – the narrative rotates around three female characters; one couple, and a single friend with crippling anxiety as they navigate their own views on body image, social and environmental wellbeing and fears for the future. You’ll certainly walk away with a bleak awareness of one’s own impact on the planet – and that nagging constant reminder that just like the dinosaurs – we are not ourselves immune from ultimate extinction. A smartly designed set and terrific …